Contents

Chapter 11
What change can improve the sexual violence support sector to better assist​
victims to engage with the justice system?

Reform of funding of the sexual violence sector

11.50One of the biggest factors underlying the issues raised in this section of the Report and elsewhere in the wider Government review is funding.718 This is two-fold – firstly, in terms of the availability of funding to implement the reform proposals in this Report and secondly, in terms of the distribution of funding to existing community and government service providers. The issue of funding does not come directly within our terms of reference but the comments here reflect our understanding that adequate funding is crucial in order to improve the experience of victims before, during, and after the justice process.
11.51As part of the wider Government review of how sexual violence services are conducted in New Zealand, it may be that the sector receives increased funding. We consider that there needs to be reconsideration of the funding arrangements of service providers, which are currently dispersed and decentralised and operate counter-intuitively to the victim-centred, wraparound model advocated for in this Report.719

11.52There is a risk that centralising funding would alienate service providers across the sector, if it was perceived as a shift towards government seeking to assume control over the sector. However, a funding allocation panel or committee that worked alongside community service providers to determine a more seamless means by which funding can be allocated from government to service providers may be a more attractive approach.

Recommendations

718See Ministry of Social Development, above n 712.
719Currently, funding is allocated by the following government agencies/departments (with the funds allocated in 2012/2013 following in brackets): ACC ($12.86 million), New Zealand Police ($1.46 million), Ministry of Health ($2.72 million), Ministry of Justice ($3.12 million), Ministry of Social Development ($7.88 million) and the Department of Corrections ($1.03 million).